Vous êtes ici:   Home Publications AAYE Working Paper Series
AAYE Working Paper Series

DocumentsDate added

Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Ascendant ]


Ce papier présente les principales théories qui expliquent l´évolution du marché du
travail. L´objectif n´est pas d´exposer chacune des théories en détail, mais de démontrer que
sur le marché du travail, l´emploi ou le chômage ne peut être expliqué par une seule
approche. Nous le ferons en nous appuyant sur quelques rappels analytiques. Tout d´abord,
nous clarifierons les concepts clés de notre travail, par la suite, nous présenterons l´analyse
classique et néoclassique du marché du travail qui attribue le chômage au dysfonctionnement
du marché du travail, puis la vision keynésienne qui impute le chômage à une insuffisance de
la demande effective. On abordera aussi la thèse marxiste et les nouvelles théories du marché
du travail, pour enfin clore par une synthèse des travaux empiriques relativement liés aux
notions d´ouverture extérieure, de capital humain et d´emploi.
Mots clés : Revue littéraire - Ouverture extérieur, Capital humain, emploi ;


The Ali (2013, EB) findings on the nexuses among institutions, finance and investment could have an important influence on policy and academic debates. This paper relaxes his hypotheses on the conception, definition and measurement of finance and institutions because they are less realistic to developing countries to which the resulting policy implications are destined. We dissect with great acuteness the contextual underpinnings of financial development dynamics and elucidate why the Acemoglu & Johnson (2005) justification provided for the measurement of property rights institutions (PRI) is lacking in substance. Using updated data (1996-2010) from 53 African countries, we provide more robust evidence on the substitution of institutions and finance in investment. Results under many baseline and augmented scenarios are not consistent with the underlying paper. Justifications for the differences in findings are discussed. As a policy implication, the Ali (2013, EB) findings for countries with poor financial systems may not be relevant for Africa.


This paper qualitatively and quantitatively assesses the degree of resilience in the financial intermediary sector of the Economic and Monetary Community of Central African States (CEMAC) to macroeconomic shocks and discusses the relevant policy implications. Using GMM and a battery of estimations techniques, the panel-based investigations broadly show that the sub-region is vulnerable to macroeconomic shocks. Lower bank provisions result on the one hand from shortages or decreases in long-term financing, real exchange and GDP per capita growth rate on the other hand from increases of interest rates. Whereas the change in interest rate increases net income commission, the effect is negative from lower levels of short-term financing. The incidence of changes in interest rates on the interest rate margin of banks is ambiguous. The findings broadly confirm the need to incorporate macroeconomic shocks in financial policy decision making. The paper contributes at the same to the knowledge on stock management in monetary zones and the need to: (1) timely intervene to mitigate potential shocks and; (2) increase control to sustain the credibility of the banking system.

 


The Kangoye (2013, TDE) findings on the negative nexus between foreign aid unpredictability and governance could seriously affect debates in academic and policy making circles. Using the theoretical underpinnings of the celebrated Eubank (2012, JDS) literature, we first confirm Kangoye´s findings. Then extend the concept of governance from corruption to political, economic, institutional and general versions of the phenomenon. Findings from the extension run counter to those of Kangoye. It follows that in the presence of foreign aid uncertainty, governments could be constrained to improve governance standards in exchange for or anticipation of more dependence on local tax revenues. The empirical evidence is based on 53 African countries for the period 1996-2010. Two direct policy implications result. First, the Kangoye findings for developing countries are relevant for Africa. Second, when the concept of governance is not restricted to corruption, the findings become irrelevant for the continent.


Africa´s overall knowledge index fell between 2000 and 2009. South Korea´s economic miracle is largely due to a knowledge-based development strategy that holds valuable lessons for African countries in their current pursuit towards knowledge economies. Using updated data (1996-2010), this paper presents fresh South Korean lessons to Africa by assessing the knowledge economy (KE) gaps, deriving policy syndromes and providing catch-up strategies. The 53 African frontier countries are decomposed into fundamental characteristics of wealth, legal origins, regional proximity, oil-exporting, political stability and landlockedness. The World Bank´s four KE components are used: education, innovation, information & communication technology (ICT) and economic incentives & institutional regime. Absolute beta and sigma convergence techniques are employed as empirical strategies. With the exception of ICT for which catch-up is not very apparent, in increasing order it is visible in: innovation, economic incentives, education and institutional regime. The speed of catch-up varies between 8.66% and 30.00% per annum with respective time to full or 100% catch-up of 34.64 years and 10 years. Based on the trends and dynamics in the KE gaps, policy syndromes and compelling catch-up strategies are discussed. Issues standing on the way to KE in Africa are dissected with great acuteness before South Korean relevant solutions are provided. The paper is original in its provision of practical policy initiatives drawn from the Korean experience to African countries embarking on a transition to KE.

<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next > End >>
Page 2 of 8

Newsletter

Dossiers Spéciaux

New

Stop
Play

Partenaires

  • Partenaires
  • Partenaires
  • Partenaires
  • Partenaires

Language

English (United Kingdom)French (Fr)

Connexion



Suivez nous sur facebook, twitter

Photos

  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos
  • Photos

Agenda

Videos